Käthe Kollwitz, Death


























Date: c. 1893-1897
Technique: Lithograph, 22.3 cm x 18.5 cm

Known for her visceral interpretations of the suffering of the working class, Kathe Kollwitz impresses upon her viewer the extreme poverty experienced by the lower classes of turn of the century Europe. Listed as one of her most effective works, Death offers a disturbing image of death embracing a child. Her parents are depicted already in a state of despondent morning. Through her rendering of the figures faces, Kollwitz effectively captures the extreme psychological torment of the parents. Furthermore, the child's large vacant eyes represent an eerie sense of fear of the unknown. As if we are witnessing the moment of death. The image is further unified by an atmospheric quality which conveys a sense of stagnation and utter despair.

This lithograph was one of six lithographs and etchings included in the series inspired by Gerhart Hauptmann's, 1893, play entitled the The Weavers. According to Knesebeck, this work is a State B impression, from the editions by von der Becke as of 1931, printed in brown-black on copperplate paper with the von der Becke blindstamp in the lower right of the image.

Source 1
Source 2

Käthe Kollwitz, Hunger


























Date: 1923
Technique: Woodcut on dark cream, thick, rough, wove paper, 22.3 x 22.9 cm

Source

Samuel Palmer, The Lonely Tower




















Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, Connecticut

Date: 1879
Technique: Etching and drypoint, with plate tone on moderately thick, slightly textured, cream laid paper, 261 x 357 mm

Source

Erik Bodom, Moonlight (Måneskinn)



















Private collection

Date: 1869
Technique: Oil on canvas

Source

John Atkinson Grimshaw, Knostrop Hall, Early Morning


















Private collection

Date: 1870
Technique: Oil on canvas, 61 x 92.1 cm




Knostrop Hall was built in the 17th century by Adam Baynes, Member of Parliament for Leeds during the Commonwealth, whose family had lived in the district since the mid 16th century. Atkinson Grimshaw lived at the hall in the 1870s, and it was demolished in 1960.

Source 1
Source 2
Source 3

John Atkinson Grimshaw, Lovers in a Wood




























Private collection

Date: 1873
Technique: Oil on card, 23.2 x 36 cm

Source

Georges Jules Victor Clairin, The Distant Princess


















Date: 1899
Technique: Oil on canvas

A princess lointaine or princesse lointaine, (in French, "distant princess") is a stock character from medieval romances. The romantic interest of many knights errant, she was usually a woman of much higher birth, often far distant from the knight, and usually wealthier than he was, beautiful, and of admirable character. Some knights had, indeed, fallen in love with the princess owing to hearing descriptions of her, without seeing her, as tales said Jaufré Rudel had fallen in love with Hodierna of Tripoli.

Source 1
Source 2
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...